LOL at this.. Especially the last image.

LOL at this.. Especially the last image.

(Source: brianchurilla)

cryingoverspilledtea said: What's your favorite horror movie?

My favorite horror movie will always be IT. Maybe it was all the summers I spent in Maine.. Maybe because I love scary clowns.. Either way, IT is my favorite!

Wake-n-Bake Revelations #3

Not that I’m just waking up, it’s the revelation that’s late.

Yesterday my new Facebook account was disabled for violating a few of their “rules”… The rules I broke, I think, were 1) having a fake name 2) having multiple accounts 3) defending the people of Gaza on MSNBC’s comment thread over at Facebook.

Someone must have known the rules and reported me in retaliation for my unwillingness to argue.

Anyway, I went back to my old account like it was an old neighborhood bar. Familiar faces and plenty of chatter awaited me. I really like Facebook, more so than twitter. The friendships on Facebook are at a more intimate level.

If you’re on my Facebook page you see me interact with my brothers, mother, aunts, uncles, rivals, and buddies.. That’s an open door to me and my life and vice versa.

That’s why I like Facebook more.

I think I may have come full circle and I feel better this time around.

Anonymous said: DC or Marvel?

Marvel wins by a sliver.

Wake-n-Bake Revelations #2 ( could superman catch all the rockets shot at Gaza? )

As I quickly scroll through my twitter feeds this morning, desperately trying to escape the burnt children in Gaza, I’m left feeling less than optimistic about the state of the world.

This world needs a superhero, one who is entirely alien, and one who sees and speaks against the absolute barbarity of the world’s economic system and war machines.

Could Superman catch all the rockets ISREAL is firing into the neighborhoods of Gaza? Is it pointless to wonder?

Prayers for the world.. Praying for Peace.

brianchurilla:

Finished MacReady commission. Want a commission? Contact me via brianchurilla.com

brianchurilla:

Finished MacReady commission. Want a commission? Contact me via brianchurilla.com

Keep the questions coming. Anon if you want, or ask straight up. Why not? I’ll return the support.

Anonymous said: What do you like better, comic books or movies?

Hey! My first Anon question… EVER!

I like comics better, but not by too much.

Comics: 10 
Movies : 8

thebristolboard:

Original splash page by Tony Moore from The Walking Dead #1, published by Image Comics, October 2003.

This induces one of those moments where you realize that anything and everything is possible…Do what you love and fuck everything else.

thebristolboard:

Original splash page by Tony Moore from The Walking Dead #1, published by Image Comics, October 2003.

This induces one of those moments where you realize that anything and everything is possible…

Do what you love and fuck everything else.

ancientart:

The Stela of Pakhaas, 2nd-1st century B.C.E., made of limestone.

The central vignette here features a unique combination of two types of stela illustration. Normally the deceased is shown offering to Osiris, lord of the underworld, or to another deity. Alternatively, the deceased and his or her spouse receive offerings from their family. At first glance, the stela seems to fit the second category. The dead person, Pakhaas, accompanied by his wife, Nesihor, who stands behind him holding a sistrum, or rattle, enjoys the oblations of his son, Pakhy (a nickname, in effect, Pakhaas, Jr.).
This scene, however, is hardly conventional. Pakhy’s censer and Nesihor’s sistrum rarely appear in scenes of offerings to humans, and Pakhaas is not depicted as a mortal. The small image of the god Osiris that sits on his knees indicates that Pakhaas has become that god. Pakhy thus becomes Horus, who offers to his dead father, Osiris, and Nesihor is Isis. (BM)

Courtesy of the Brooklyn Museum, USA, via their online collections, 71.37.2.

ancientart:

The Stela of Pakhaas, 2nd-1st century B.C.E., made of limestone.

The central vignette here features a unique combination of two types of stela illustration. Normally the deceased is shown offering to Osiris, lord of the underworld, or to another deity. Alternatively, the deceased and his or her spouse receive offerings from their family. At first glance, the stela seems to fit the second category. The dead person, Pakhaas, accompanied by his wife, Nesihor, who stands behind him holding a sistrum, or rattle, enjoys the oblations of his son, Pakhy (a nickname, in effect, Pakhaas, Jr.).

This scene, however, is hardly conventional. Pakhy’s censer and Nesihor’s sistrum rarely appear in scenes of offerings to humans, and Pakhaas is not depicted as a mortal. The small image of the god Osiris that sits on his knees indicates that Pakhaas has become that god. Pakhy thus becomes Horus, who offers to his dead father, Osiris, and Nesihor is Isis. (BM)

Courtesy of the Brooklyn Museum, USA, via their online collections71.37.2.